Temporary Foreign Workers in Canada's Hospitality and Food Manufacturing Industries

Temporary Foreign Workers in Canada’s Hospitality and Food Manufacturing Industries

In the intricate web of Canada’s labor market, temporary foreign workers (TFWs) have played a pivotal role, particularly in the accommodation and food services as well as the food manufacturing industries. A recent exploration into their sociodemographic journey from 2000 to 2020 sheds light on their transition to permanent residency and their subsequent retention within the same industry post-immigration.

Transition in Accommodation and Food Services

The study, titled “Temporary Foreign Workers with Lower-Skill Occupations in the Accommodation and Food Services Industry unravels compelling insights.

  • Between 2010 and 2014, 29% of TFWs with lower-skill occupations in the accommodation and food services industry successfully transitioned to permanent residency within their first five years.
  • Comparatively, their counterparts with higher-skill occupations and study permit holders exhibited higher transition rates of 45% and 49%, respectively.
See also  Enhanced Support for Israeli and Palestinian Nationals in Canada: IRCC Updates

While TFWs with lower-skill occupations had a lower transition rate, their sheer population size led to a larger number attaining permanent residency. Remarkably, nearly 40% of TFWs with lower-skill occupations who became permanent residents between 2011 and 2015 continued their journey in the accommodation and food services industry five years after immigration. In contrast, TFWs with higher-skill occupations showed a higher retention rate (52%), while study permit holders lagged at 16%.

Challenges in Food Manufacturing Industry Retention

The parallel study, “Temporary Foreign Workers with Lower-Skill Occupations in the Food Manufacturing Industry: Transition to Permanent Residency and Industrial Retention after Transition,” uncovers distinct dynamics. TFWs with lower-skill occupations in the food manufacturing industry, arriving between 2010 and 2014, faced a lower cumulative transition rate to permanent residency (39%) compared to those with higher-skill occupations (48%).

See also  Open Work Permits in Canada – Eligibility, Application, and Extension Explained!

The retention journey in the food manufacturing industry exhibited a gradual decline over the initial five years after immigration. Among TFWs with lower-skill occupations who became permanent residents from 2011 to 2015, the retention rate dwindled from 73% in the first year to 36% five years later. Interestingly, the retention of TFWs with lower-skill occupations decreased with each successive landing cohort, indicating evolving challenges in industry retention.

Navigating Pathways Forward

These studies not only highlight the complex dynamics of TFWs in the Canadian labor market but also underscore the need for nuanced policies and support mechanisms. As Canada continues to benefit from the contributions of temporary foreign workers, understanding their journey and addressing retention challenges are crucial steps in fostering a resilient and inclusive labor environment.

See also  Ottawa Updates Innovation Stream Pilot Requirements for Foreign Workers

Add ImmigCanada to Your Google News Feed

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.